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FAQ: IT in Education

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Parents & Their Children

School Administrators

Special & Gifted Education

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References (Annotated)

Announcements Archive

This section contains copies of the recent email messages that have been sent to the OTEC Distribution List that consists of all OTEC members. It also contains some of the Announcements posted in the Announcements of the Home Page.
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The Emerging Possibility of Developing a Computer Simulation of a Human Brain. (Moursund's 6/22/05 discussion of two recently published articles.)

On 6/17/05, two new references were added to the section on Arguments Against ICT in Education. See also Amy Herzner reference 8/20/05.

Economic future of the US and the world—"The World is Flat." Video of a speech, and also a nice interview, with Thomas Friedman. All educators should become familiar with this major paradigm shift brought on by ICT.

Free books and other materials from Dave Moursund. Three books have been recently revised.

ISTE's SIG Teacher Education is presenting a full day workshop on preservice teacher education, for NECC 2005. Extensive Website.

Section on Parents & Their Children was updated 3/4/05.

Excellent article on children and media such as TV and computers.

The Computer Games section of the References has been extensively expanded 2/8/05.

UNESCO Website for ICT for Teachers.

Daphne Koller receives $500,000 MacArthur "genius" award for her research in AI.

An interesting article on women and computing has been added to the Women and Computing section.

A (free) version of Moursund's book Overview of Computers in Education is now available.

Several new items have been added on history and other social sciences education, at the beginning of the Social Sciences section of Integrating IT into each subject area.

Moursund, D.G. (March, 2003). Website to support self-assessment of preservice and inservice teachers, and planning for ICT programs in precollege education.

Moursund, D.G. (2003). Brief Introduction to Educational Implications of Artificial Intelligence. Sixty-nine page book available free.

Several new items have been added on history and other social sciences education, at the beginning of the Social Sciences section of Integrating IT into each subject area.

Moursund, D.G. (March, 2003). Website to support self-assessment of preservice and inservice teachers, and planning for ICT programs in precollege education.

Moursund, D.G. (2003). Brief Introduction to Educational Implications of Artificial Intelligence. Sixty-nine page book available free.

Date: Tue, 26 Nov 2002 10:14:29 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Oregon's Current Common Curriculum Goals in Technology

The state of Oregon has not established specific content standards and benchmarks in technology. Nevertheless, the state believes that technology plays an essential role in a student's education. To that end the following revisions to the Technology Common Curriculum Goals were adopted by the State Board in March 2002:

  1. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of technological tools and devices.
  2. Select and use technology to enhance learning and problem solving.
  3. Access, organize and analyze information to make informed decisions, using one or more technologies.
  4. Use technology in an ethical and legal manner and understand how technology affects society.
  5. Design, prepare and present unique works using technology to communicate information and ideas.
  6. Extend communication and collaboration with peers, experts and other audiences using telecommunications.

While all schools in Oregon are equipped with technology and most have a technology plan, each school's capacity and resources are different. Consequently school districts may, as some already have, establish their own content standards and benchmarks in technology around their individual needs and resources.

National standards in technology have been developed through a partnership between the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), the U.S. Department of Education and a wide variety of curriculum and educational organizations. These national standards as well as input from teachers, technology specialists, administrators, business representatives and professional organizations were used in reviewing and revising Oregon's Technology CCGs.

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Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 17:07:30 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: ocite: Welcome to new OTEC members

Hello, and Welcome to people who have recently joined the Oregon Technology in Education Council.

From time to time (averaging a little less than twice per week) I send a message to the OTEC membership on a topic that may be of interest to members.

Copies of the messages sent during the past nine months can be retrieved by clicking on Archived Announcements (whick is about midway down the page) on the OTEC Home Page at http://otec.uoreogn.edu/

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Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 13:13:55 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Advance Placement via Distance Learning Courses

ONLINE ADVANCED-PLACEMENT COURSES FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

The University of Wisconsin at Madison announced it will create a series of online advanced-placement courses for high school students. The courses will be developed under the auspices of a new organization, the Wisconsin Advanced Placement Distance Learning Consortium, created at the university's School of Education. The university will train high-school teachers to administer the courses, which will be available next fall. According to an official involved, 25 percent of Wisconsin's high schools do not offer advanced-placement courses, while some schools only provide a few. The online nature of the courses is intended to make them available to the state's rural and inner-city students, many of whom do not have access to such courses otherwise. Organizers expect initially to offer courses in 12 subjects to between 500 and 700 students. Chronicle of Higher Education, 19 November 2002 (Edupage 20 November 2002

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Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 13:13:55 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Advance Placement via Distance Learning Courses

International Children's Digital Library. Accessed 11/20/02: http://www.icdlbooks.org/

This is an excellent project and Website. The following description is quoted from a National Science Foundation Press Release of 11/18/02:

Project Targets Online Collection of 10,000 Books from 100 Cultures

Led by the University of Maryland and the Internet Archive, a partnership of government, non-profit, industry and academic organizations will launch the world's largest international digital library for children on Wednesday, Nov. 20, during a ceremony at the Library of Congress. The project is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with additional support from other partners as part of a long-term research project to develop new technology to serve young readers.

The new International Children's Digital Library (ICDL) will provide children ages 3 to 13 years with an unparalleled opportunity to experience different cultures through literature. The new digital library will begin with 200 books in 15 languages representing 27 cultures, with plans to grow over five years to 10,000 books representing 100 different cultures.

The requirements for running ICDL are:

Macintosh running OS X with broadband network connection.

PC with 256 Meg RAM and at least a 700 MHz PIII processor with broadband network connection.

You also need Java 1.4 installed which you can download for free. Unix machine with 256 Meg RAM with broadband network connection, and Java 1.4 installed which also can be downloaded for free.

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Date: Tue, 19 Nov 2002 11:49:14 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Additions and updates to the OTEC Website

Here is a list of the Announcements on the Home Page of the OTEC Website. The address for the Home Page is http://OTEC/uoregon.edu/

The Parents & Their Children section of this Website has been revised and updated as of 11/19/02.

A new section has recently been added on Data, Information, Knowledge, and Wisdom. Can a computer system be knowledgeable and wise?

Dave Moursund recently completed a 48 page booklet: Brief Introduction to Roles of Computers in Problem Solving. This is available for free in both HTML and PDF formats. It is designed for preservice and inservice teachers

A section on American Indian Education, with a special emphasis on American Indians in Oregon, has recently been added to this Website. If you have information on uses of computer technology in American Indian education in Oregon or elsewhere, please send it to Website Author "Dr. Dave" Moursund.

The International Society for Technology in Education has created a Special Interest Group for School Administrators. See: http://www.iste.org/sigadmin/. OTEC is an organization affiliate of ISTE.

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Date: Fri, 08 Nov 2002 10:40:26 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Urban schools and good teachers

Arthur Levine is president and professor of education at Teachers College, Columbia University. A 1982 Guggenheim Fellowship winner, Levine has also won other awards including the American Council on Education's Book of the Year Award in 1974 and the Educational Press Association's annual award for writing in 1981 and 1989. He co-authored Beating the Odds with Jana Nidiffer. The following brief news item stresses the need for well prepared teachers and for increased investment in addressing the problems of urban public schools. : Public Education Network PEN@PublicEducation.org is an excellent source of brief news items such as this.

EDUCATION REFORM: THE WAR WE HAVE CHOSEN TO LOSE

Do you agree that the U.S. does not care about urban schools and the children who attend them? That is the conclusion of Arthur Levine, who writes that the nation's urban public schools will not substantially improve without a sufficient investment. The improvement with the greatest effect on student learning is a well-prepared and experienced teacher. These teachers will not work in inner cities until salaries and incentives are higher than in suburbs, which offer easier working conditions. States, but also Washington, have to invest more heavily in cities than in suburbs if they expect to see real changes. Putting businessmen in charge and installing standards and tests won't win the war either. Urban public schools need teachers, facilities and curriculum materials. The argument that there is no money doesn't make sense. There is money for tax cuts, money for war, money to bail out faltering industries. How can there be no money for children and schools? http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/commentary/
la-oe-levine4nov04,0,3783078.stor y?
coll=la%2Dnews%2Dcomment%2Dopinions (From: Public Education Network PEN@PublicEducation.org November 8, 2002)

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Date: Tue, 05 Nov 2002 11:27:03 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: IT in Math Education

I have previously mentioned my work on IT in Math Education. I have

recently updated this site. One important added piece is a discussion of What is Mathematics, presented from a computer-oriented point of view. See the What is Mathematics menu item at http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~moursund/Math/

The main idea presented there and in the Major Unifying Themes section is that math education can be significantly improved through better teacher education and through appropriate and routine integration of computers and calculators into the curriculum, instruction, and assessment. And, of course, there needs to be greatly increased emphasis on general ideas of problem solving, such as those presented in

http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~moursund/SPSB/

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Date: Tue, 05 Nov 2002 11:19:16 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Archival Storage

The following brief news item has been added to the News Items section of the OTEC Website.

Researchers Work to Preserve Languages

Some have predicted that between 50 and 90 percent of the world's languages will disappear within the next hundred years. An initiative called the Rosetta Project aims to create an archive of more than 1,400 languages facing extinction. According to Doug Whalen, founder of the Endangered Language Fund, no digital technology has "a ghost of a chance of being taken as seriously archival" for the long term. The Rosetta Project will use technology created by Los Alamos Laboratories and Norsam Technologies that micro-etches text on a high-density storage disk. The disk is expected to last for 2,000 years and can be read with a 1,000 power microscope, ensuring that it will be useful and accessible for many future generations. For each language, the disk will contain vocabulary lists, grammar, numbering systems, and sample texts. Wired News, 4 November 2002 http://www.wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,54345,00.html (Edupage, November 04, 2002)

I found this article interesting both because of its topic area (the American Indian component of the OTEC Website at http://otec.uoregon.edu/american_indians.htm has been significantly expanded in the past week) but also because of its mention of an archival storage method that may last 100 times as long as storage on a CD or DVD.

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Date: Sat, 02 Nov 2002 10:36:27 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Cc: Pat Rounds <plrounds@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

Subject: Search Engines in foreign languages

Go to http://www.cyberdifference.com/ and select Foreign Search Engine Directory from the left side menu. There you will see lots of search engines in lots of languages.

You may want to tell the foreign langauges teachers in your school about this site.

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Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 09:40:17 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Free Booklet on Problem Solving

As part of my "continuing saga" of being retired, I have just thoroughly revised and somewhat expanded a booklet:

Brief Introduction to Roles of Computers in Problem Solving

It is available (free) in both HTML and PDF formats. The intended audience is preservice and inservice teachers, and other educators. The PDG version is 46 pages in length. My belief is that booklet would be useful in any preservice teachers' Methods Course as well as in courses specifically on IT in Education.

It is available at:

http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~moursund/SPSB/

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Date: Mon, 21 Oct 2002 11:00:22 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: ISTE's New Resource for Integrating Handhelds in Classrooms

Many schools are considering the use of handheld computers (palm tops). The message given below is from ISTE and describes a new book they have just published.

---------- Forwarded message ----------

Date: Thu, 17 Oct 2002 16:52:19 -0700 From: ISTE Membership Services <memberservices@iste.org> To: Educational Leaders <members@discussion.iste.org> Subject: ISTE's New Resource for Integrating Handhelds in Classrooms

Dear Educational Leader,

Just a quick note that ISTE's new book, PALM HANDHELD COMPUTERS--A COMPLETE RESOURCE FOR CLASSROOM TEACHERS, is in stock NOW. The authors--Michael Curtis, Bard Williams, Cathleen Norris, David O'Leary, and Elliot Soloway--are early adopters with many years of experience between them and have distilled their field knowledge into a practical, accessible guide for using, managing, and integrating handhelds into standards-based K-12 curricula.

Tell your colleagues they'll find:

  • a practical, accessible guide complete with an overview of Palm technology, lesson plans, and assessment resources; * tips and templates for managing student use of handhelds;
  • an included CD-ROM of freeware programs developed at the University of Michigan's Center for Highly Interactive Computing in Education (Hi-CE);
  • more information and a free excerpt at www.iste.org; and
  • easy ordering online (www.iste.org/bookstore) or by calling Membership Services at 1.800.336.5191.

We're very excited about PALM HANDHELD COMPUTERS and trust you'll help spread the word about this new, technology-rich resource from ISTE. And, don't forget that we offer special prices for members and bulk buyers. Sincerely,

Jack Buchanan Director, Membership Services

P.S. This resource also has a companion Student Software Guide! Look for it at www.iste.org/bookstore/.

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Date: Mon, 21 Oct 2002 10:27:26 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Art Education

Over the years, schools have cut out more and more of what many consider to be essential components of education, such as art and music provided by specialists in these areas.

Thus, the regular classroom teacher is increasingly responsible for such components of a child's education at the elementary school level.

The Knowledge Loom has launched a new spotlight -- Teaching For Artistic Behavior: Choice-based Art Education. It focuses on student-centered learning. We are also adding some new success stories throughout the month. The Website address is: http://knowledgeloom.org/tab/index.jsp

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Date: Fri, 11 Oct 2002 10:15:01 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: All education is social (says a leading computer scientist)

Johan de Kleer is Manager of the Systems and Practices Laboratory, Palo Alto Research Center (PARC). Widely published in the areas of qualitative physics, model-based reasoning, truth maintenance systems, and knowledge representation, he has co-authored three books: "Readings in Qualitative Physics," "Readings in Model-Based Diagnosis," and "Building Problem Solvers." In the award designating him an ACM Fellow, de Kleer was praised for his "seminal contributions of effective techniques for qualitative representation and reasoning about physical systems, and leadership in building research teams that span multiple disciplines."

The following is quoted from: http://www.acm.org/ubiquity/interviews/j_dekleer_1.html

DE KLEER: The biggest thing was coming to PARC and watching how people actually use technology and learning to manage and see how organizations actually function. And discovering that all learning is social. Perhaps now I'm being too social, but you have to balance the two. One without the other gets you nothing. Getting back to the physicist: the path he envisions will take far longer than he ever expects. He needs a far deeper understanding of what he is actually looking for. Pure bottom-up approaches have not created the breakthroughs in science, and I do not believe they will succeed in artificial intelligence. Remember, studying feathers and birds did not get us flight

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I feel the entire interview article is worth reading. It gives some insights into the direction of research on Artificial Intelligence as well as the direction of the Web.

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Date: Thu, 03 Oct 2002 08:47:33 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Computational Science

The National Science Foundation has released a very interesting report: Computation As a Tool for Discovery in Physics. http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2002/nsf02176/start.htm

A few highlights of the 51 page report are given below.

The report emphasizes the importance of "computation" as an approach in all sciences, not just in physics. Also (see the last paragraph given below) it emphasized the need for changes in education to reflect the powers of computational science.

In very brief summary, computational science is developing and using computer models of science problems.

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Date: Thu, 19 Sep 2002 10:50:51 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: A computer game

I found the following brief news item interesting for two reasons:

1. It highlights a some gaming software that girls use as much as boys.

2. It indicates that gaming software is now being used to advertise specific brands of consumer products.

In the olden days, video game makers paid tens of thousands of dollars to car makers to use real-world race cars in their driving games, and millions of dollars to the NFL to use its teams in their football games. Now, in what's considered a seismic shift for the industry, Electronic Arts has inked a multimillion deal with Intel and McDonald's in which the companies will be the ones spending money for the privilege of seeing their logos in EA's "The Sims Online" -- the latest version of the popular "Sims" series. The game enables players to simulate real life, choosing occupations, buying and furnishing houses, dating, marrying and having kids. Half of its players are girls and young women, which is unusual because computer games typically skew toward boys and young men. In the new game, players will be able to buy Intel PCs, which will help them boost their characters' logic skills and fun factor, and can run a McDonald's kiosk to make money. "We felt we could strengthen our brand identity and increase awareness of our products with the women and young adults who play this game," says the director of co-marketing at Intel. "This is our first product placement in an online environment. Before this, we did very, very little in the way of product placement." (Los Angeles Times 16 Sep 2002) (NewsScan Daily, 16 September 2002 ("Above The Fold")

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Date: Sun, 15 Sep 2002 11:12:30 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: ISTE/NCATE Standards for Technology Facilitators and Teachers

Note: The following refers to preparation of technology-oriented teachers and facilitators.

The NCATE standards lie at the heart of quality teacher preparation. ISTE has developed performance assessment standards for initial and advanced educational computing and technology programs including:

  1. the technology facilitation initial endorsement;
  2. the technology leadership advanced program; and
  3. the secondary computer science education preparation programs. Institutions offering one or more of these programs should respond to the corresponding set of program standards.

Technology Facilitation (TF) -- Initial Endorsement Standards Technology Facilitation (TF) endorsement programs meeting ISTE standards prepare candidates to serve as building/campus-level technology facilitators. Candidates completing this program will exhibit knowledge, skills, and dispositions equipping them to teach technology applications; demonstrate effective use of technology to support student learning of content; and provide professional development, mentoring, and basic technical assistance for other teachers who require support in their efforts to apply technology to support student learning. (Revised Fall 2001)

Technology Leadership (TL) -- Advanced Program Standards Technology Leadership (TL) advanced programs meeting ISTE standards prepare candidates to serve as technology directors, coordinators, or specialists. Special preparation in computing systems, facilities planning and management, instructional program development, staff development, and other advanced applications of technology to support student learning and assessment will prepare candidates to serve in technology-related leadership positions at district, regional, and/or state levels. (Revised Fall 2001)

Secondary Computer Science Education (CSED) -- Endorsement/Degree Program Standards Secondary Computer Science Education programs meeting ISTE standards prepare candidates to serve as teachers of computer science in secondary schools. They focus on preparing their students in the more technical aspects of computing such as problem analysis, algorithm selection and evaluation; program design, implementation, specification, and verification; and systems analysis. (Revised 1997 -- Slated for Revision, Fall 2002) The draft proposed new standards are available at http://cnets.iste.org/. See: NCATE NEWS (9/10/02) Proposed Secondary Computer Science Education Standards to be reviewed for adoption by NCATE in October of 2002.

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Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 14:08:30 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Suggestion for a project-based learning activity

The brief news item given below indicates that 10% of the electricity use in North America is for powering computer systems.

Here is a project to be done by a team of students in a school. Decide on several categories of electricity use in your school, such as lights, heating, computers, air conditioning, and so on. Gather data to make good estimates of the electricity use in each category. Report on the results.

Expand the project by working with a number of schools. The schools first have to agree to the categories of electricity use that they will explore. They can then gather data and do a compare/contrast across schools.

========

IBM INVESTIGATES LOW-POWER COMPUTERS

IBM's Low Power Center, located at the company's Austin, Texas, research lab, will receive $2 million in funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). According to IBM, an average data center spends 25 percent of its budget on electricity to run and cool computers, and 10 percent of North America's electricity is used for IT systems. The Low Power Center works to develop computers that use significantly less power without sacrificing performance. Nick Donofrio of IBM said that though chips seem to be a reasonable place to start, the entire computer must be examined for ways to save electricity. The DARPA grant will support research into low-power storage systems as well as other projects. CNET, 6 August 2002 http://news.com.com/2100-1001-948677.html (Edupage, August 07, 2002)

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Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 10:09:03 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Free book on grant writing for technology in education

I have completed the revisions on my book on Obtaining Resources for Technology in Education. The complete book is available on the web at: http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~moursund/
GrantWriting/index.htm

My recent reading of the literature suggests that one way that a school can improve itself is to have a number of the faculty, administrators, and other staff, and Site Council members working jointly in grant writing and other activities to obtain resources. This does several things:

  1. With luck and persistence, it obtains resources.
  2. It develops a community of people who work together (to obtain resources).
  3. It provides a pathway for professional growth (capacity building) for the people who are involved.

At the National Educational Technology Conference in June I was the lead presenter in a full day workshop designed to teach grant writing. The goal was to teach faculty in teacher education programs how to design and implement a unit on grant writing into their preservice or insrvice teacher education programs. I have been doing that in my courses for a number of years. One of my co-presenters, Keith Wetzel at Arizona State University West does it for his students. The unit of instruction that I use takes about three class hours, along with the appropriate correspond amount of outside of class reading and homework.

So ... if you teach preservice or inservice teachers, I would like to work with you to help you learn to implement such a unit of instruction. I am interested in the possibility of doing "several" free workshops around the state of Oregon on this topic. (These would be paid for by my PTTT grant.)

I am looking for situations in which I would do a full day workshop for some combination of teachers of preservice and inservice teachers, inservice or preservice teachers who might be interested, Site Council members, etc. The workshop can accommodate perhaps 20 to 30 people, or so. Participants would gain the knowledge and skills to beging writing grant proposals.

If you are interested in arranging for such a workshop during the coming academic year, please cotact me. Note that while my grant will pay my full costs, it will not pay for coffee breaks and/or lunch for participants in the workshop. The local site will need to provide appropraite facilities. The workshop is probably best done in a hands on environment with no more than two people per machine, and with Web access.

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Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 11:14:37 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: IT-Using Teacher Education Faculty <or-it-scde@lists.uoregon.edu>

Cc: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: IT in TAG and ESOL

I am sending this message both to the general OTEC list and to the IT-Using Teacher Education Faculty. The latter is one of the OTEC Discussion Groups that is open to anyone who wants to join and participate in discussions.

At the end of this past term I did my usual Exit Interviews with students in a preservice teacher education course I teach. Two topics that came up seem to me particularly relevant to OTEC.

  1. This particular group of preservice elementary education majors were in a five-year program of study, and they took the Information Technology specialization during their fifth year. During the five year program they studied both general education and special education, and achieved licensure in both areas. BUT, during their five-year program of study they claim that they received exactly one hour of instruction on Talented and Gifted Education. (That was before I gave them some readings and an assignment on Information Technology and TAG.) I am wondering if other teacher education programs in the state do better than this. (It is hard to imagine that they do worse!)
  2. As far as I can determine, the situation in terms of English as a Second or Other Language is equally grim. The state of Oregon has a steadily growing number of ESOL students. Significant progress is occurring in ways to make effective use of Information Technology as an aid to these students (Computer-Assisted Language Learning). Thus, I am wondering what the preservice teacher education programs in Oregon are doing in terms of preparing all preservice teachers to work with ESOL students, and preparing them to make effective use of Information Technology in working with such students.

The OTEC Website contains some useful resources on both TAG and ESOL. See:

http://otec.uoregon.edu/special_and_gifted.htm

http://otec.uoregon.edu/esol.htm

People interested in ESOL will also want to take a look at the recently updated Website:

http://www.lclark.edu/~krauss/toppicks/toppicks.html

Michael Krauss, who maintains this Website, is one of the leaders in ESL and technology in Oregon and the nation.

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Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 11:20:19 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Telecommuting workers and students

The following brief news item is quoted from NewsScan Daily, 17 June 2002.It gives some specific data on current levels of telecommuting in the US. From a student point of view, going to school is a job. Thus, one can view the steady increase in the use of Distance Learning as a type of telecommuting. And, of course, some of the teachers of these telecommuting students are also telecommuting.

TELECOMMUTING STILL GAINING IN POPULARITY

The number of U.S. workers toiling at home three or more days a week rose nearly 23%, from 3.4 million in 1990 to 4.2 million in 2000, according to U.S. Census figures. Meanwhile, the estimated number of workers telecommute at least some portion of the week jumped more than 42% in two years, from 19.6 million in 1999 to 28 million in 2001, according to the International Telework Association and Council (ITAC). Most telecommuters live in New England and on the East and West coasts in areas with dense population and notorious traffic congestion, and more than two-thirds of telecommuters polled for an ITAC survey expressed satisfaction over their at-home worker status. "They're saying, 'This is three hours I don't need to be in the car, and I could be with my kids, pick (up) the dry cleaning, or whatever,'" says ITAC president Tim Kane. A formal E-Worker program instituted two years ago at Cigna Corp. has seen productivity increases of up to 15% among teleworkers while job turnover rates in some divisions of the company were cut in half. (AP 16 Jun 2002) http://apnews.excite.com/article/
20020616/D7K6EEM00.html

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Date: Thu, 13 Jun 2002 10:55:41 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Arguments against IT in education

Date: Thu, 13 Jun 2002 09:55:08 -0700 (PDT)

Larry Cuban, a professor at Stanford, provides some of the best work being done in this field. The reference given below is to a 2001 book by Cuban. You might want to pay particular attention to the next to last paragraph in the review materials quoted below.

------------------------

Cuban, Larry. (2001). Oversold and Underused: Computers in the Classroom. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. A review of this book is available at: Accessed 6/13/02: http://coe.asu.edu/edrev/reviews/rev168.htm. Quoting from the review:

To find out if computers are changing education practice, Stanford historian of technology in education, Larry Cuban, took a look at the impact of computers in the community where extensive integration seems most likely. He looked into the preschools, Kindergartens and secondary schools where the people who develop the new technologies send their children. He also looked at Stanford University, an institution that feeds the developers of the high tech industries of the Silicon Valley region of California.

At every level he examined, there was the unexpected outcome: "In the schools we studied, we found no clear and substantial evidence of students increasing their academic achievement as a result of using information technologies." (p. 133) So where is the problem? Not in lack of access: "Students and teachers had access to computers and related technologies available in both their homes and their schools." (p. 132)

Cuban also rejects the most common response from critics of the schools, what he calls the "blame and train" approach--technophobic teachers who must be forced to be trained. He found little evidence of resistance by teachers to using technology. In fact, many used it extensively to prepare their work, communicate with parents, colleagues and students, maintain records, and carry out research. However, "less than 5 percent of teachers integrated computer technology into their curriculum and instructional routines." (p. 133) In fact, "the overwhelming majority of teachers employed the technology to sustain existing patterns of teaching rather than to innovate." (p. 134)

Cuban does not find that result disturbing--or even surprising. In his previous studies of the introduction of new technologies over the past century, the results were similar. This happened with radio, film, television and the early use of large "main frame" computers. Promoters claimed that each new technology would revolutionize schools. In fact, each received some use, but within the context of existing instructional practices.

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From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Increasing use of online education

The National School Board Foundation recently commissioned a study that asked a variety of interesting questions about IT in education. The study surveyed a large number of schools at the precollege level. For details, go to the Website: http://www.nsbf.org/thereyet/index.htm

Here is one example of what the study revealed:

What percentage of students will be receiving one-third or more of their instruction online in the next three years?

None at all to 9% ------------- 34%

10% to 20% -------------------- 37%

21% to 40% -------------------- 18%

41% to 60% --------------------- 5%

61% to 80% --------------------- 3%

81% to 100% -------------------- 2%

Source: Grunwald Associates

Suppose that this data proves to be a modestly accurate predictor of the future. Then about 2/3 of students will be receiving 10% or more of their education via distance learning. This suggests that it will be routine for a teacher to be teaching some students who are taking a distance learning course.

To continue the analysis. Let's use just the minimal 10% figure. With well over 50 million students in US school, 2/3 of this is about 34 million, and 10% of that is 3.4 million. If this number of students take 1/3 of their coursework by distance learning, this is equivalent to somewhat more than a million full time equivalents! That number is roughly the same as the number of students that are being home schooled.

The point is, we may well be beginning to see a major change in our public education system based on increased use of distance learning.

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Date: Thu, 06 Jun 2002 08:52:54 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Guidelines for checking web resources

The following reference is to an article written for journalists. But, its underlying ideas are relevant to a much wider audience.

Dube, Jonathan (May 31, 2002). Internet IQ Checklist for Journalists [Online]. Accessed 6/6/02: http://www.poynter.org/web/053102Jon.htm.

Quoting from the article:

Evaluating online information is one of the trickiest and most important parts of using the Internet in your reporting, so I thought I'd follow up Sree's tips on judging accuracy with a checklist to help guide you. Here are five steps for assessing information quality (IQ) that you should run through before relying on anything found online:

Authority: Who wrote it, why, and what are their credentials? Who published it and why? With whom are the author and publisher affiliated?

Objectivity: What opinions or biases, if any, are expressed? Is there a sponsor that might have influenced the content? Is the site a mask for advertising or an agenda? Could it be satire or a hoax?

Timeliness: When was it produced and last updated? Is it up-to-date?

Sourcing: What is the source of the information and is it reliable?

Verification: Find at least one other reputable source, preferably not online, that provides similar information.

If you can't determine even one of these, then you probably shouldn't rely on the information.

-------

This reference has been added to the Journalism page of the Integrating IT Into Each Subject Area of the Website http://otec.uoregon.edu/

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Date: Fri, 31 May 2002 10:59:15 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: OTEC is now an ISTE Affiliate Member

OTEC is now an ISTE Affiliate. (5/28/02) Details on the meaning of being an ISTE Affiliate Member are available on the ISTE Website at http://www.iste.org/members/affiliates/. Quoting from that Website: ISTE affiliates form an international network of local and regional non-profit organizations dedicated to improving teaching and learning through the appropriate use of educational technology. ISTE works to provide affiliates with a national and international context within which to address concerns of local, regional, and international import.

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Date: Fri, 24 May 2002 10:59:07 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Distance Learning Learning Opportunity

A final reminder to sign up for the Online Learning Institute to be held at Jackson ESD in Medford from June 24-28. Cost is only $65 for a weeklong inservice in online teaching and learning.

Guest presenters include: Dave Moursund, Library of Congress, PBS, Camille Cole, NWREL. Breakout sessions touch on many aspects of online pedagogy, resource organization, communication, multimedia, and course production.

Go to http://www.jacksonesd.k12.or.us/it/soos/oli/ for more detailed information and an application form

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Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 08:48:56 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Summer institute at Pacific University in Forest Grove, Oregon

The Berglund Summer Institute, to be presented June 16-21 at Pacific University in Forest Grove, Oregon will examination of the appropriate role of the Internet in education. See http://bcis.pacificu.edu/

At the core of Berglund's mission is the examination of the appropriate role of the Internet in education. Educators at all levels and executives at software and hardware companies are struggling with questions such as how much computer interaction is appropriate, does it vary by academic discipline, by grade level, by the age of the student? Does the answer vary based upon the audience served by different institutions?

Some argue that brick and mortar universities will quickly be replaced by virtual campuses and professors will no longer lecture, but will be transformed into facilitators. Such predictions have, understandably, caused ripples of fear to spread in some sectors of academia, leaving a feeling of bitterness associated with the Internet.

Others believe education would be best served if the role of the Internet is limited to communication. They see the Internet leading to standardization. They view online education as restrained and confining. They question how faculty can bring their best to online courses. They fear it leads to shallow research and to plagiarism.

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Date: Tue, 21 May 2002 10:04:25 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Invention of writing

Writing was invented by the Sumerians in approximately 3200 BC (a little over 5,000 years ago). The Website http://www.usatoday.com/life/cyber/
2002/05/21/cuneiform.htm contains a nice (relatively short) description of the history of cuneiform and of current projects to develop an online dictionary and to put a lot of the early writings online.

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Date: Wed, 15 May 2002 16:18:07 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: ISTE & NECA Members Approve Merger! (fwd)

---------- Forwarded message ----------

Date: Wed, 15 May 2002 15:50:38 &endash;0700

From: ISTE Membership Services memberservices@iste.org

To: Leading ISTE Member members@discussion.iste.org

Subject: ISTE & NECA Members Approve Merger!

SPECIAL NOTICE TO ISTE MEMBERS

Members of the International Society for Technology in Education and the National Educational Computing Association have voted overwhelmingly to accept the bylaws of a new organization to be formed by merging ISTE and NECA. The merger becomes effective June 1, 2002. The resulting organization will retain the name International Society for Technology in Education with headquarters opening in Washington, D.C., in the summer of 2002.

For 2002--2003, the "new" ISTE will be governed by a board of directors formed by combining the membership of both organizations' boards.

The full press release about this exciting merger can be viewed at:

http://www.iste.org/news/2002/05/14-merger.html

Join us this year at NECC 2002 in San Antonio where we will be celebrating this momentous occasion!

Sincerely,

Jack Buchanan

Director, Membership Services

==========

This message was forwarded by Dave Moursund, OTEC Webmaster. Before the merger, both ISTE and NECA were headquartered in Eugene, Oregon. It is my understanding that the bulk of the employees of the merged companies will remain in Eugene.

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Date: Fri, 10 May 2002 12:05:46 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Small schools

The following is quoted from the May 9, 2001 issue of Public Education Network PEN@PublicEducation.org

It is particularly relevant in Oregon, because Oregon has a number of small schools and school district. It is relevant to discussions about Distance Learning because Distance Learning is especially helpful to students, teachers, and schools in rural communities.

SMALL WORKS: VIRTUES OF SMALL SCHOOLS

The issue of school size is at the forefront of education reform in this country. Time and again, research has shown that small schools make a valuable and noticeable difference in students' education. But while larger, urban schools are embracing this evidence by downsizing or creating "schools within schools," small, rural schools continue to be consolidated out of existence due to the mistaken belief that one big centralized school is more efficient, and therefore, better. The result is a large, consolidated school to which students must be bused long distances from their homes, where there is no sense of community investment in the school, and where parent and community participation in school affairs suffers because the school district is so distant. Recognizing schools as centers of communities, the Rural Trust believes that smaller truly is better. This article examines three small schools and gathers anecdotal evidence to identify the characteristics of those schools that can help explain why small works--and that small, rural schools are worth saving.
http://www.ruralchallengepolicy.org/
rr_v3no2.html#small

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Date: Thu, 09 May 2002 15:23:19 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: OTEC makes progress toward being admitted as an ISTE

Affiliate

The message given below indicates that OTEC has made good progress toward being accepted as an Affiliate of ISTE. You can read about ISTE Affiliates at http://www.iste.org/members/affiliates/index.html

 

The ISTE Affiliates hold a full day meeting at the National Educational Computing Conference. This year's meeting is on Saturday June 15. I will be attending that meeting, and an organization can have more than one member present. If you plan to attend or if you have information that you would like me to convey to the Affiliates, please let me know.

 

 

Thanks

 

Dave Moursund

College of Education

University of Oregon

Eugene, Oregon 97403

Phone 541.346.3564

Fax 541.346.5174

http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~moursund/dave/

http://otec.uoregon.edu/

 

---------- Forwarded message ----------

Date: Thu, 09 May 2002 21:06:28 +0000

From: snichols@smtp.iste.org

To: moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU

Subject: OTEC

Hi Dave,

Congratulations! The OTEC application was approved by the Affiliate Executive Committee for Affiliate status pending the ISTE Board approval. Once the ISTE Board meets (first week of June), you will receive a packet in the mail explaining benefits of Affiliation. For now, I'd like to invite you to attend the Affiliate meeting at NECC in San Antonio. It is on Saturday June 15 7:30 am- 5 pm at the Hyatt. There is also a reception the night before from 7-9 pm.

Will someone from OTEC join us? If so please let me know as soon as you can so that I can reserve you a spot!

Thanks

Sarah

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Date: Thu, 25 Apr 2002 15:41:09 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Ashland, Oregon featured in new FREE sites

As you all know, FREE is a large collection of Web materials made available by various US Government agencies. The latest additions to FREE included:

"Ashland, Oregon: From Stage Coach to Center Stage" highlights 32 historic places in this community located 14 miles north of California at the foot of Mt. Ashland. These places together illustrate the development of Ashland from a small transportation & farming center founded in 1852 into a community with a strong cultural identity. (NPS,NRHP) http://www.cr.nps.gov/nr/travel/ashland/

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Date: Sun, 14 Apr 2002 15:18:13 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Web design for children

Jakob Nielsen's Alertbox, April 14, 2002: Kids' Corner: Website Usability for Children The Executive Summary is well worth reading it is available at: http://www.useit.com/alertbox/20020414.html.

Summary quoted from the Executive Summary:

Our usability study of kids found that they are as easily stumped by confusing websites as adults. Unlike adults, however, kids tend to view ads as content, and click accordingly. They also like colorful designs, but demand simple text and navigation.

The following is the Usability Problems Hurt Kids section of this Executive Summary of the full report. (They want a significant amount of money for the full report.)

The idea that children are masters of technology and can defeat any computer-related difficulty is a myth. Our study found that children are incapable of overcoming many usability problems. Also, poor usability, combined with kids' lack of patience in the face of complexity, resulted in many simply leaving websites. A fourth-grader said, "When I don't know what to do on a Web page, I just go look for something else."

Also, children don't like slow downloads any more than adults do. As one first-grade girl said, "Make it go faster! Maybe if I click it, it will go faster..."

Young children often have hand-me-down computers, whether at home (where they often inherit older machines when their parents upgrade) or at school (where budget constraints mandate keeping machines in service for many years). Kids also typically have slow connections and outdated software. Given these limitations, websites must avoid technical problems or crashes related to access by low-end equipment. Faced with an error message, kids in our study told us that they see them a lot, and that the best thing to do is to ignore them or close the window and find something else to do. Usability Problems Hurt Kids

Several types of classic Web usability problems caused difficulties for the kids in our study:

Unclear navigational confirmation of the user's location confused users both within sites and when leaving them. Inconsistent navigation options, where the same destination was referred to in different ways, caused users to visit the same feature repeatedly, because they didn't know they had already been there. Non-standard interaction techniques caused predictable problems, such as making it impossible for users to select their preferred game using a "games machine." Lack of perceived clickability affordances, such as overly flat graphics, caused users to miss features because they overlooked the links. Fancy wording in interfaces confused users and prevented them from understanding the available choices.

Several types of classic Web usability problems caused difficulties for the kids in our study:

* Unclear navigational confirmation of the user's location confused users both within sites and when leaving them.

* Inconsistent navigation options, where the same destination was referred to in different ways, caused users to visit the same feature repeatedly, because they didn't know they had already been there.

* Non-standard interaction techniques caused predictable problems, such as making it impossible for users to select their preferred game using a "games machine."

* Lack of perceived clickability affordances, such as overly flat graphics, caused users to miss features because they overlooked the links.

* Fancy wording in interfaces confused users and prevented them from understanding the available choices.

===============

This is a message being sent to all OTEC members by:

Dave Moursund, OTEC Webmaster
College of Education University of Oregon Eugene, Oregon 97403
Phone 541.346.3564 Fax 541.346.5174
http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~moursund/dave/ http://otec.uoregon.edu/

--------------------------------------------------

Date: Mon, 01 Apr 2002 08:40:00 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject:: Bioinformatics

From time to time you have received OTEC messages stressing how computer technology is changing the sciences. (For example, we now have Computational Biology, Computational Chemistry, Computational Physics.)

Here is a brief Quote from a National Science Foundation RFP. It indicates that the NSF is trying to give a big push to Computational Biology.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have identified bioengineering and bioinformatics as essential underpinning fields in the 21st century. The agencies are collaborating on an important high profile effort to meet the anticipated bioengineering and bioinformatics human resource needs.

The purpose of this high value program is to provide students majoring in the biological sciences, computer sciences, engineering, mathematics, and physical sciences with well planned interdisciplinary bioengineering or bioinformatics research and education experiences in very active 'Summer Institutes', thereby increasing the number of young people considering careers in bioengineering and bioinformatics at the graduate level and beyond. For the purpose of the Program Solicitation, bioengineering and bioinformatics are considered in their broadest sense; we welcome innovative applications from all arenas.

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2002/
nsf02109/nsf02109.htm

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Date: Mon, 11 Mar 2002 09:03:57 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Computer transcription of lectures

The Liberated Learning Project is testing computer transcription of college class lectures in three countries. Here is a little information:

Liberated Learning Project: Stanford U. Will Test a Computerized Transcription System [Online]. Accessed 3/11/02: http://chronicle.com/free/2002/01/2002012401t.htm.

Quoting from this Chronicle of Higher Education Article:

Stanford University is the first test site in the United States for a Canadian system designed to give students with disabilities a better shot at succeeding in college.

Students testing the Liberated Learning Project (LLP) at colleges and universities in Canada, Britain, and Australia find they no longer need note takers at lectures where LLP is used.

Although LLP adds some extra work for the lecturer, students, including those without disabilities, give the innovation positive reviews.

Using voice-activated software, the system immediately converts a teacher's words into print that is flashed onto a large screen.

After the lecturer edits the session for accuracy and corrects words that sound the same, the lecture is made available to all students online. For the visually impaired, it can be quickly translated into Braille.

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Date: Fri, 08 Mar 2002 14:12:01 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: School reform: computers get a good mention

The materials given below are quoted from http://www.ets.org/news/02011701.html which is an Educational Testing Service Website. The complete report is available free through an address given on that Website. Notice the fifth numbered item in the quoted document. [I numbered the items that were originally given as bullets.]

---------------

Princeton, N.J. (Jan. 17, 2002) A decade of research on factors affecting student achievement shows that current efforts to reform elementary and secondary education need to go far beyond federal law, standards, and accountability, according to a new study by the ETS Policy Information Center.

Facing the Hard Facts in Education Reform identifies key factors that influence educational achievement that are often overlooked during education reform. The author, Paul Barton, of ETS's Policy Information Center, says these issues need to be included in current reform efforts.

Barton notes that a decade of research has identified the following obstacles to high academic performance by the nation's students:

  1. increased tardiness, absenteeism, drug use, and verbal abuse of teachers by students, as well as the presence of gangs in schools
  2. weak signals students receive from parents on the importance of doing better academically, too much emphasis on extracurricular affairs, and students' fear of being less popular if they work hard
  3. mixed messages from prospective employers who fail to look at student transcripts when they hire and colleges that establish low admission standards
  4. failure to understand the importance of preschool development and the critical role that parents play in such areas as reading to young children and restricting TV watching
  5. lack of effective use of computers in the classroom, due in large part to inadequate preparation of teachers in their use
  6. viewing the test itself as the treatment, rather than using standardized tests to determine whether efforts to create content standards, performance standards, curriculum change, and teacher preparation are working

"In identifying these areas, I do not suggest that we lessen our efforts in implementing the standards-based reform agenda," Barton concludes. "It makes good and common sense to make instruction rigorous, set high standards, and develop quality standardized tests. However, in a full standards-based reform effort, testing is just one important component."

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Date: Mon, 04 Mar 2002 09:29:46 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: ocite: Science of teaching and Learning

The word "science" in Science of Teaching and Learning refers to use of scientific methods, research based methods. A good overview of this topic is available in the proceedings of a recent conference:

Scientifically Based Research--U.S. Department of Education (6 February 2002). [Online]. Accessed 3/4/02: http://www.ed.gov/nclb/research/.

Quoting from the Website:

The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, which reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, calls for the use of "scientifically based research" as the foundation for many education programs and for classroom instruction.

On February 6, 2002, Assistant Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education Susan Neuman hosted a seminar where leading experts in the fields of education and science discussed the meaning of scientifically based research and its status across various disciplines. Below is the transcript of the seminar.

Russell Gersten from the University of Oregon was one of the discussants in the conference. He talked about math education. One of his findings is that pairing students up is effective. (Cooperative learning, or peer tutoring, in groups of two, with heterogeneous students.) He also found that providing students with good feedback on how well they are doing on specific topics (perhaps every two weeks) is effective. His findings are based on an analysis of the research literature.

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Date: Mon, 25 Feb 2002 12:31:43 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Arguments against IT in education

Most of us OTEC members are supportive of IT in education. However, not all people support substantial use of IT in education. There are a number of people who have written and spoken about the downside of IT in education. The OTEC Website contains a reasonably substantial annotated bibliography of arguments against IT in education. It has recently been updated and expanded. See: http://otec.uoregon.edu/arguments_against.htm If you have suggestions for additions to that Webpage, please send them to me.

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Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2002 12:40:35 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Cc: Ira Erbs <ierbs@pja.pvt.k12.or.us>

Subject: Historical data on prices of computers

Thanks to Ira Erbs <ierbs@pja.pvt.k12.or.us> two new references have been added to the History of Calculators, Computers, and Internet page of the OTEC site. This is at http://otec.uoregon.edu/history_of_computers.htm. UVIVAC Memories [Online]. Accessed 2/20/02: http://www.fourmilab.ch/documents/univac/index.html. Quoting from the Website: People who have used a 100 megabyte hard drive that weighed two and a quarter tons and cost more than US$130,000 in 1968 experience a special sense of wonder when tucking one of today's 2.1 gigabyte drives, just purchased for less than US$1,000 and weighing less than half a kilo, into their pocket. ^Ê In 1968 you could pick up a 1.3 MHz CPU with half a megabyte of RAM and 100 megabyte hard drive for a mere US$1.6 million.

Sahr, Robert. Inflation Conversion Factors for Dollars 1700 to Estimated 2010 [Online]. Accessed 2/22/02: http://www.orst.edu/Dept/pol_sci/ fac/sahr/sahr.htm

As an example, consider a computer system costing US$1 million in 1967. To convert to dollars for the year 2000, divide by .194. The result is US$5.15 million.

Or, consider the data given in UNIVAC Memories. The $130,000 2.25 ton 100 megabyte hard drive of 1968 is equivalent to #130,000/.202 = $644,000 in year 2000 dollars.

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Date: Wed, 13 Feb 2002 14:36:10 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: ocite: Future Teacher Conference

Oregon's First Annual Future Teacher Conference will be held on March 2 at Linn Benton Community College. Details and registration materials are available at http://www.clubed.pdx.edu/FTC.html

The Future Teacher Conference is a one-day event with the goal of providing high school seniors and college students with the skills and information they need to become successful teachers. The conference is designed and organized by students, to guarantee that the topics of discussion and the speakers will be relevant and of interest to them. The members of the planning committee are students from various two- and four-year colleges around Oregon. A few faculty members are also serving on the planning committee for support and assistance .

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Date: Wed, 13 Feb 2002 14:09:35 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Gender Equity

The brief news item given later in this email has recently been added to the OTEC site. The OTEC site contains an extensive annotated bibliography of Gender Equity resources. See: http://otec.uoregon.edu/women_and_computing.htm

Here's an idea--In whatever discipline you teach, assign your students to study and write about Gender Equity within that discipline. Or, pick a specific area such as Gender Equity in Technology and make the same assignment--both for girls and for boys.

----------------

Gender Equity

A recent study by computer scientist Tracy Camp reports that the percentage of women who earned undergraduate computer science degrees has dropped from 37% of total in 1984 to less than 20% in 1999. Anita Borg, founder of the Institute for Women and Technology at Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center, has this explanation of the problem: "Part of the image of working on computers is working to create gadgets -- techie stuff having nothing to do with people's lives. Young women want to have a positive impact on people. If we can get across that there are powerful ways to have a hugely positive impact on people, then maybe we can turn that image around... Women are not there filling the slots, and the companies are too shortsighted to go out of their way to recruit them. Even when human resources people ask, 'How do we get the women? How do we bring in the minority people?' they only want to know how to get them this week. They are unwilling to consider their environment and their advertising." (San Jose Mercury News 11 Feb 2002) http://www.siliconvalley.com/ mld/siliconvalley/2651855.htm (NewsScan Daily, 12 February 2002).

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Date: Tue, 05 Feb 2002 09:49:05 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Recent News Items

From time to time Brief News Items (and comments discussing their educational implications) are posted to the OTEC Website. The following list consists of titles of recent postings.

Faster, Faster: No Slowdown in Moore's Law". We are experiencing continued very rapid progress in building faster microprocessors.

Majority of U.S. Population Now On the Internet

Implanted Electrodes Help Paralyzed Man Walk Again. Digital Equity Toolkit. A free set of materials designed to help educators address the Digital Divide issue. Voice Input of Teacher's Lecture. Voice input can now be used to provide a transcript of a faculty member's presentation to a class.

Managing the Memories. Indexing and making accessibility a tape library of more than 50,000 video tapes.

Steadily Increasing Amounts of Distance Learning in Higher Education.

Each of these Brief News Items is a "clickable" item on the OTEC Website Homepage at: http://otec.uoregon.edu/

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Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 14:05:05 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Oregon's CCGs in Information Technology

The Oregon Department of Education has a Webpage where it places information about Instructional Technology Standards. It is located at: http://www.ode.state.or.us/cifs/technology/

You may be especially interested in two items on that page. The first is a link to the current Common Curriculum Goals for technology, while the second is a link used to provide input on and feedback on a proposed new set of CCGs for technology. The Oregon Department of Education is looking for input through the end of this month.

At the current time, there is set of seven Common Curriculum Goals for Technology:

TECHNOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE: Demonstrate understanding of technological concepts and processes, and their relationship to and impact on other disciplines.

  1. Understand the nature and evolution of technology.
  2. Understand that technology can be used to solve problems and meet needs.
  3. Assess the impacts and consequences of technology.
  4. Understand the relationships between technology and other disciplines.

TECHNOLOGICAL APPLICATION: Apply technological concepts and processes to solve practical problems and extend human capabilities.

  1. Use a variety of technological systems.
  2. Demonstrate how technological systems are operated and controlled.
  3. Adapt technological concepts and processes to biological, informational and physical systems to form technologies and solve practical problems.

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Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 10:18:44 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: ocite: Multimedia

For a number of years, ISTE's SIGHyper has run a multimedia contest for students and their teachers.

The rubrics used in this contest are useful to any teacher who has students doing hypermedia. They are available at:http://www.ncsu.edu/midlink/rub.multi.htm

The contest itself may well interest some of your students. Moreover, the Contest Website offers access to trail versions of good software. See:

http://www.ncsu.edu/midlink/mmania.how.html

Quoting from this Website:

This awards program is for students and teachers who use multimedia to teach and learn in a specific content area (e.g., math, science, social studies, language arts, art, music, physical education, ESL, etc.) Students are invited to share their work with an international audience by creating dynamic multimedia projects related to any class or coursework. Multimedia Mania winners usually come from classrooms in which technology is used as a tool to teach and learn any standard curriculum. Teachers may coach and advise, but work must be completed by students in grades K-12.

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Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2002 13:20:19 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: ocite: Agenda for Board Meeting 2/1/02 in Portland

The OTEC Board is meeting 9:00 to 3:00 on Friday February 1 in the Smith Memorial Center at Portland State University. This is an open meeting, so any OTEC member and any other interested people can attend.

Details of the Agenda can be found by going to OTEC's Homepage at http://otec.uoregon.edu/ and looking in the Announcements section near the top of the page.

If you have items that you would like to bring to the Board's attention, please send them directly to me via email.

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Date: Mon, 24 Dec 2001 10:03:39 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Cc: Nancy Willard <nwillard@ordata.com>

Subject: Important information for all school administrators

Please bring the following information to the attention of school administrators. It is information that has recently been added to the School Administrator's page of the OTEC Website.

Willard, Nancy (2001). A Children's Internet Protection Act Planning Guide [Online]. Accessed 12/24/01: http://netizen.uoregon.edu/documents/cipa.html. Quoting from the Website:

This Planning Guide addresses the wide range of issues that districts will have to consider to achieve compliance with CIPA. The primary focus on the Guide is on the substantive issues related to the development of a comprehensive plan to address concerns regarding the safe and responsible use of the Internet by young people. The Guide also presents positive strategies to address concerns related to the use of Technology Protection Measures, most specifically the concern of the prevention of access to appropriate material.

The Guide includes templates for a district Policy, district regulations, a Student Internet Use Policy, a Student/Parent Agreement, and a text-version of the Internet Safe and Responsible Use Plan in format that can be provided to the community. Educators may modify any of the templates provided to serve the local community.

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Date: Sun, 23 Dec 2001 14:27:29 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Telesurgery

Here is a brief news item I found particularly interesting, and my comment. (And, I am wishing you the best of holidays and a happy new year!).

Telesurgery

In a discussion of "the telesurgery revolution" in The Futurist magazine, surgeon Jacques Marescau, a professor at the European Institute of Telesurgery, offers the following description of the success of the remotely performed surgical procedure as the beginning of a "third revolution" in surgery within the last decade: "The first was the arrival of minimally invasive surgery, enabling procedures to be performed with guidance by a camera, meaning that the abdomen and thorax do not have to be opened. The second was the introduction of computer-assisted surgery, where sophisticated software algorithms enhance the safety of the surgeon's movements during a procedure, rendering them more accurate, while introducing the concept of distance between the surgeon and the patient. It was thus a natural extrapolation to imagine that this distance--currently several meters in the operating room--could potentially be up to several thousand kilometers." A high-speed fiber optic connection between New York and France makes it possible to achieve an average time delay of only 150 milliseconds. "I felt as comfortable operating on my patient as if I had been in the room," says Marescaux. (The Futurist Jan/Feb 2002) (NewsScan Daily, 20 December 2001)

Comment: This brief article discusses three major changes in surgery that have begun during the past decade, and that are due to progress in Information and Communications Technology. These are examples of ICT becoming a significant component of the field of medicine. Each area of human intellectual endeavor is being significantly changed by ICT. As educators, we should be implementing changes in curriculum content, instructional processes, assessment, and our own professional work to appropriately reflect the continuing rapid pace of change that ICT is bringing to all of the areas that we teach. Unfortunately our rate of progress in these endeavors is lagging behind the pace of change of ICT.
--------------------------------------------------

Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2001 09:40:28 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: ocite: Four important items

This is a general emailing to the OTEC membership, covering four topics:

  1. The following brief news item is aimed at business people. We (educators) are in the business of helping students learn. Education is a very large business. It is quite interesting and challenging to think about the educational system meaning of John Scully's statement. Are you "future ready?"

    When Darwin magazine asked John Sculley, the Pepsi Cola marketing genius who replaced Steve Jobs (and was himself eventually replaced) as CEO of Apple Computer, "What's the most important lesson that people can learn from technology?" he answered: "They can learn to be future-ready. That means they have to adapt to probably the biggest power shift since the introduction by Henry Ford 100 years ago. They have to adapt to a shift from producers in control of important business decisions to a new world where customers are in control of everything and customers are defining what brands they want. And the customers will be extremely demanding. They will want the best quality, the best service, the cheapest prices customized exactly the way they want it and they will want it right away. The question is, how does a company make money when customers have so much control over so many things?" (Darwin 15 Nov 2001) http://www.darwinmag.com/read/thoughts/ (NewsScan Daily, 5 December 2001)

  2. The International Society for Technology in Education has released its Standards for School Administrators. I strongly encourage you to direct school administrators to the OTEC Website page: http://otec.uoregon.edu/school_administrators.htm When you do so, it will be helpful if you are familiar with the contents of this page, including the new ISTE Standards.
  3. The OTEC Website has reached the level of containing useful information for all preservice and inservice teachers, and teachers of teachers. If there are topics that you feel need to be added or expanded, please send your suggestions (and, suggestions on specific Web links) to me. AND, please begin to get use of the Website integrated into preservice and inservice education, and into the everyday lives of educators at all levels.
  4. The OTEC Board will be meeting in Portland on February 1, 2002. We will likely approve a Constitution and Bylaws. The current drafts can be located by going to the OTEC Homepage: http://otec.uoregon.edu/ Feedback is still being sought. In addition, we are sill looking for people who are interested in serving on the Board.

I wish all of you happy holidays and a great new year.

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Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2001 14:49:22 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: ocite: Talented and Gifted

Many of you have children who are Talented and Gifted. All of you know of children who have been or could be classified as TAG. The TAG Webpage on the OTEC Website has been substantially updated during the past two weeks. To get to it, look under the "Announcements" section on OTEC's Homepage: http://otec.uoregon.edu/ In addition, more materials have been added to the Lesson Plans page (also listed in the Announcements section of the OTEC Homepage).

Both of these OTEC WebPages may be of interest to your students and colleagues. PLEASE HELP TO PUBLICIZE THEM.

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Date: Tue, 20 Nov 2001 11:22:01 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: ocite: OTEC Website now has a section on Lesson Plans

The "References" section of the OTEC Website has been expanded by the addition of a section on Lesson Plans and Websites for Teachers. This new section is highlighted on OTEC's HomePage at http://otec.uoregon.edu/ Please tell your colleagues and students about the OTEC Website.

Thanks

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Date: Mon, 19 Nov 2001 10:52:48 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: ocite: Technology Review magazine

Technology Review is one of my favorite magazines. I have been a subscriber for many years. The magazine is also available free on the Web at http://www.techreview.com/ The December issue contains an article: The Next Computer Interface By Claire Tristram. In brief summary The desktop metaphor was a brilliant innovationQ30 years ago. Now it's an unmanageable mess, and the search is on for a better way to handle information. It is interesting to see some of the ideas that are being developed for replacing the desktop metaphor.

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Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 11:00:10 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Hertert A Simon

This brief message has two purposes. First, please note that the organization EDUCAUSE publishes a very useful periodical EDUCAUSE Review that they make available free online at: http://www.educause.edu/pub/er/erm.html. The organization focuses on IT in higher education.

Second, a piece of history. Herbert Simon was one of the pioneers in the field of Computer and Information Science. His interests were wide ranging, and he contributed to many parts of the field. He is especially known for his contributions in Artificial Intelligence. He was awarded the 1978 Nobel Prize for his work in Economics. The Website listed above contains a copy of his 1987 article The Steam Engine and the Computer: What Makes Technology Revolutionary. This article suggests that (in 1987) the field of IT was still very young relative to how long it takes a major technology (such as the steam engine) to have a significant impact on the world.

Note Aded 11/16/02: Herbert Simon died February 9, 2002. He was one of the pioneers of the compute field. The Steam Engine and the Computer is available at http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/erm0132.pdf.

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Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2001 10:30:44 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Funds to defray expenses of OTEC Board Meeting

The OTEC Board will meet at Portland State University on February 1, 2001.

Moursund's PTTT grant has recently received some supplementary funding that can help to cover travel expenses of those currently on the Board and for some others who are interested in serving on the Board.

If you are currently on the OTEC Board and/or if you are interested in serving on the Board, please contact me for details on this funding.

-------------------

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Date: Fri, 09 Nov 2001 12:50:17 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: ocite: Good, FREE educational resources

Each month I receive a notice like the following:

Sixteen new resources in the arts, health, language arts, science, & social studies have been added to the Federal Resources for Educational Excellence (FREE) website. FREE makes it easy for teachers, parents, students, & others to find teaching & learning resources from more than 40 federal organizations. http://www.ed.gov/free/

The FREE site now contains a huge amount of good stuff. If you haven't checked it out lately, you may be surprised! Among other things, this site contains access to:

Gateway to Educational Materials (http://www.thegateway.org/), which offers a database of more than 17,000 education resources across more than 100 web sites. This database is made possible by the Federally supported GEM Consortium, a group of non-federal organizations and Federal agencies that have developed an education-specific metadata profile, controlled vocabularies, and tools for using the profile and vocabularies.
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Date: Tue, 06 Nov 2001 12:00:58 -0800 (PST)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: ocite: Geographic Awareness Week

The week November 12-16 is the National Geographic Awareness Week. You might want to visit the Website of the Oregon Geographic Alliance:

Oregon Geographic Alliance (OGA) [Online]. Accessed 11/6/01: http://geogres.pdx.edu/oga/index.html.

Also, there is a lot of good material for teachers at:

National Geographic Society: Geography Action [Online]. Accessed 11/6/01: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/geographyaction/.

Dave

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Date: Tue, 16 Oct 2001 08:22:37 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Upcoming OTEC meeting

The OTEC Board will meet on February 1, 2002 at Portland State University. Details are available on the Home Page of the OTEC Website, http://otec.uoregon.edu/

People who are not currently on the Board are welcome to attend. (This is an excellent opportunity to get yourself involved in OTEC activities, and perhaps become a Board member!)

One of the "Action Items" at this meeting will be voting on the Draft Constitution and Bylaws. A copy of these documents can be viewed by going to the OTEC Homepage. We are seeking feedback from all people who have an interest in OTEC.

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Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2001 15:36:20 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: ocite: Software for students in Arizona

Arizona has about 850,000 students in its public schools. The following brief news item discusses a statewide purchase of software for these students.

MASSIVE ASP DEAL CALLED "UNPRECEDENTED"

The state government in Arizona has signed the largest-ever applications service provider deal to provide Microsoft Office applications to 850,000 students. Arizona will pay $8.16 per user in the deal with Cox Communications. Because the Arizona Supreme Court ruled in 1996 that the state must provide students with equal access to facilities and equipment, jurisdiction over technology purchases was centralized, and Arizona officials began planning a statewide infrastructure. In February, the state struck a deal with Qwest to provide high-speed bandwidth to its schools, and Cox Communications expects to sell cable modem service to students who want to access the Office applications from home. (Computerworld, 27 August 2001) (Edupage, August 29, 2001)

Schools in Oregon can purchase software (such as mentioned above) through the Oregon Educational Technology Comsortium (http://www.oetc.org/), at very competitive prices.

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Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2001 14:55:14 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: School Administrator IT Standards from ISTE

Version 3.0 of the Draft Technology Standards for School Administrators is up on the ISTE Website for viewing and for submitting feedback. Go to http://cnets.iste.org/tssa/

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Date: Wed, 15 Aug 2001 09:38:59 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Social Studies

Those of you who are interested in social studies education may want to look at the following website: Conway, Grant. Professional Website [Online]. Accessed 8/15/01: http://www.4j.lane.edu/~conway/index.html. Grant Conway teaches a variety of social studies courses at Churchill High School in Eugene, Oregon. In addition, he teaches a social studies methods course for preservice teachers at the University of Oregon. In addition to all of this, he is a doctoral student at the UO, with a specific interest in improving social studies instruction through appropriate use of IT and other approaches.

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Date: Sun, 12 Aug 2001 14:13:13 -0700 (PDT)

From: Dave Moursund <moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>

To: Oregon Technology in Education Council <ocite@lists.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Another IT community idea? (fwd)

In the message given below, an Oregon teacher is looking for others interested in teaching IT and CS at the precollege level.

Dave Moursund

---------- Forwarded message ----------

Date: Thu, 09 Aug 2001 07:45:24 -0700

From: Boo Rayburn <booooo@teleport.com>

To: moursund@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU

Subject: Another IT community idea?

I was looking around your web page and found the page http://otec.uoregon.edu/it-using-educators.htm. On it you asked about starting a virtual community of IT using educators... I am curious about being involved with other teachers who are teaching computer applications, web design, programming, etc. to middle and high school students. This would be a great area to share projects and help to get some technology scoring guides (that really work) in place. I have also found that there is not a lot of consistency between schools on what is included in a course that is titled " computer 1" yet several schools have a "Computer 1" class...

Just an idea and I am sure you get a ton of them a day!

Boo Rayburn

Middle School Computer Teacher

Salem, OR

 

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