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IT in Oregon's Preservice Teacher Education

IT in Oregon's Continuing Professional Development

Teacher Education Programs

 

This section focuses on IT in the actual program of study that tends to be under the control of a school, college, or department of education (SCDE) in a College or University. The SCDE is able to specify the staff and content of these courses.

There are a variety of teacher education programs in Oregon. Some are 4-year programs (an undergraduate degree coupled with an initial teaching license). Some are five year programs, while others are 5th year programs. These varying programs offer widely varying opportunities for preservice teachers to learn to make effective use of IT in curriculum, instruction, assessment, and their professional careers. Here are four categories of components that may go into helping preservice teachers develop needed IT knowledge and skills.

  1. Initial IT Course. (It is common to require such a course, although the requirement may not be that the course it taken early on during the program of study.)
  2. Integrating IT into Non-IT Courses. (Increasingly, there is an emphasis on integrating appropriate IT use and instruction into methods courses, curriculum courses, work samples, and field placements.)
  3. More Advanced IT Courses. (Some programs of study offer advanced IT coursework for preservice teachers seeking to specialize in this area.
  4. Program-long Requirements. (A program of study might have an Electronic Portfolio requirement that preservice teachers work on throughout their program of study. A program may have requirements that students demonstrate IT competencies through a variety of means, and that this can be done piecemeal as they progress through their program of study.)

References

Bridging Arts & Sciences and Teacher Education: Summary of the 2002 Oregon Arts and Sciences Summit [Online]. Accessed 6/28/02: http://www.ous.edu/aca/A&Ssummit02.htm. Quoting from the Website:

The second annual Oregon Arts and Sciences Summit was held in Salem, Oregon, on April 25, 2002. Like the first Summit held April 25, 2001, the 2002 theme was also "Bridging Arts & Sciences and Teacher Education." Both Summits focused on the role of Arts and Sciences in preparing a quality PreK-12 educator workforce in Oregon.

The idea for an Education and Arts and Sciences statewide meeting emerged in spring 2000 when a group of Education and Arts and Sciences representatives were convened for a specially called meeting to discuss how new teachers would learn the content required by the state's changing standards under K-12 school reforms with the Interagency Management Team which provides assistance to Oregon's Title II Quality Assurance in Teaching Program (O-QAT) grant. The discussion was so fruitful that the group recommended that a more inclusive meeting, representing all campuses and including K-12 and community college representatives, be held in subsequent meetings. Thereafter, the O-QAT project sponsored both the 2001 and 2002 Summits.

Oregon University System: Teacher Education [Online]. Accessed 4/6/01: http://www.ous.edu/aca/tchred.htm. Links are provided to:

  • Teacher/Educator Preparation Programs. College and university educator preparation programs in Oregon.
  • Educator Licensure in Oregon. Types of educator licenses; how to obtain licensure; information on required tests.
  • Doctoral Programs in Education. Description of various doctoral programs in education, links to campuses.
  • Teacher Employment Information Teacher shortage areas. Searchable websites listing job opportunities for Oregon educators.
  • Education Programs, Projects, Grants. Oregon programs and projects in the field of teacher education.
  • Oregon Studies, Reports, and Research in Education. Oregon-based educational reports and research.
  • OUS Deans' Council on Teacher Education Reports and initiatives of the Dean's Council on Teacher Education. Title II reporting requirements.
  • Key Organizational/Resource Links in Teacher Education. Various educational research/information-sharing websites, governmental sites, accreditation institutions, and school reform sites.

Proficiency-based Admissions Standards System [Oline]. accessed 4/6/01: http://www.ous.edu/pass/. Quoting from the Website:

The Oregon Legislature passed laws in 1991 and 1995 requiring high schools to offer Certificates of Initial and Advanced Mastery (CIM and CAM). In 1993 the Oregon University System created the Proficiency-based Admission Standards System (PASS) to keep college admissions in step with changes being made to accommodate CIM and CAM. PASS is based on proficiencies -- the knowledge and skills that are critical to success in university study. Students will develop and demonstrate these proficiencies during their education in Oregon public high schools.

The 1998-99 school year was the first year that performance on CIM assessments was used to determine if a student had met the specified CIM standards (statements of expectation for student learning) in English and mathematics. In the fall of 2001, two years after first having the opportunity to demonstrate skills as sophomores for the CIM, students applying to Oregon's seven state universities will have the option of demonstrating proficiency in English and math to meet admission requirements in those subjects. Subsequent freshman in-state applicants will have the option of demonstrating proficiency in science (2002), visual and performing arts (2003), second languages (2004), and social science (2005). Beginning with fall term 2005, applicants from Oregon public high schools will be expected to meet proficiency requirements in all six content areas.

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Initial IT Course for Preservice Elementary Education Teachers at the University of Oregon

Most teacher education program requires some IT coursework for their preservice teacher education majors. There are significant variations in these courses. This is a topic that OTEC will address. Here is an example of one such course.

Educational Studies 114: Communication Using Computers

(University of Oregon: 4 quarter hours of credit)

Introduction to information-age issues; communication among people and information sources; design, editing, and use of messages that are represented, stored, and processed digitally.

This course is required of all students seeking admission to the Integrated Teaching preservice education program at the University of Oregon. The Integrated Program is designed to prepare elementary school teachers in a combination of regular education and special education. During their fifth year, students do their student teaching and also do a specialization in one of several different areas. One of the areas is IT. Here is a listing of the Skills and Concepts that students learn in Educational Studies 114: Communication Using Computers.

Conceptual

  • Students have a conceptual model of the Internet and of how information flows from site to site.
  • Students understand that the design of documents -- both electronic and printed -- affects the quality of communication of the documents.
  • Students understand the difference between typing and word processing.
  • Students understand when to use a word processor and when to use a graphics application for page layout.
  • Students understand the difference between a paint and a draw application and when to use each.
  • Students understand the purpose of a database and the purpose of a spreadsheet and have an entry level understanding of when to use a database and when to use a spreadsheet to solve a problem.
  • Students understand the difference between linear documents and hypermedia documents and can distinguish which format is best for presenting particular information.
  • Students have an understanding of the effect of technology on society in general and on education in particular.
  • Students understand that they are moving into a world where change brought about by technology is dramatic and that in order to keep up professionally they must continue to learn about technology and the changing world of information interchange

Telecommunications

  • Fluent use of email. Students learn the current mail program and learn to read, reply to, forward, and manage their mail. In addition, they know how to print email messages and work with attachments.
  • Familiarity with the World Wide Web. Students learn to use the current Web browser. While everyone will not have examined the same sites, they will be familiar with the College of Education web site and will have had experience "surfing" outside of the University. They also know how to use search engines and how to do "advanced" searches.

Word Processing

  • Sophisticated skill using a word processor. All students have learned how to use word processor rules rather than typing rules. They also know how to use such tools as Spell checkers. Note that AppleWorks is the software taught in this course.
  • Inclusion of graphics. Students learn how to incorporate graphics into word processing documents. These graphics include student-created graphics, clip art, graphics from the Web and graphs and charts.
  • Style sheets. Students learn how to use Style Sheets in AppleWorks. Style sheets are a way of naming the formatting -- typeface, paragraph settings, margins, etc. -- in a document so that it can be used over again both in the same document and in other documents. All modern word processors and high level spreadsheets and graphics programs include style sheets.

Graphics

  • Ability to use Paint tools. Students learn how to use paint tools in AppleWorks to create their own graphics or to modify clip art.
  • Ability to use Draw tools. Students learn how to use draw tools in AppleWorks to create such items as labeled drawings, posters, signs, or advertisements. They know how to incorporate pain images into draw documents.

Databases and Spreadsheets

  • Familiarity with databases. Students learn to use AppleWorks to explore existing databases and to create a simple database of their own. They also learn how to create simple reports using a database.
  • Familiarity with spreadsheets. Students learn to use AppleWorks to manipulate simple spreadsheets and to create a spreadsheet of their own. They learn to use simple formulas and to create charts and graphs from spreadsheet data.

Hypermedia

  • Students understand the concept of a storyboard and how to use it to plan a hypermedia presentation.
  • Students understand the concept of hypermedia and have developed simply hypermedia documents using MicroWorlds Pro.

Design

  • Students understand the use of type to create professional-looking documents, including the use of en- and em-dashes, smart quotes, italics to replace underlining and correct spacing after punctuation.
  • Students understand the use of type as a design element. They know what kinds of type to use for what purposes and understand how to use type to make documents that are readable.
  • Students understand the importance of creating documents that are clear, easy to read, appealing to the eye and communicate effectively.
  • Students understand the basic principles of design used by professional designers. They know how to enhance communication by applying these principles to documents containing text and graphics.
  • All students have designed a significant document such as a newsletter. They understand the steps involved, the necessity of feedback to improve a design, and the importance of frequent redesign to create effective documents.

Reference

Communication Using Computers: EDST 114 [Online]. Accessed 12/9/00: http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~skyoder/classes/classes.html.

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Integrating IT into Non-IT Courses

What follows is a sample assignment that can be integrated into almost any preservice teacher educatoin course. It is designed to introduce students to OTEC.

The Oregon Council for Technology in Education and Educational Technology (OTEC) is grassroots organization of people dedicated to improving both formal and informal education at all levels in Oregon through the appropriate use of Information Technology (IT). It has a special focus on preservice teachers and on beginning teachers.
  1. Go to the Oregon Technology in Education Council Website at http://otec.uoregon.edu/. On the homepage, read the paragraph that begins with "The Oregon Technology in Education Council (OTEC) is a grassroots organization …" Join both the general OTEC Email Distribution list and one of the discipline-specific lists.
  2. Over a period of one week, send at least two email messages to the discipline-specific list that you have joined, and cc your course instructor on your messages.
  3. Browse the OTEC Website until you find some component that seems particularly relevant to your interests in education and to the education course that has made this assignment. Briefly summarize the information you have found, why it is of interest to you, and why it is relevant to the course you are taking. Send this brief report to your course instructor via email.

Here is a more advanced assignment, suitable for preservice or inservice teachers who have a good start on integration of IT into curriculum, instruction, assessment, and their own person professional work.

There is a steadily growing research and practitioner base of knowledge on how IT can be used to improve the education of students and the professional lives of educators. The sense of direction of the field of IT in education is to make effective higher-order uses of IT in curriculum, instruction, and assessment, and in the professional work of educators.

The Oregon Council for Technology in Education and Educational Technology (OTEC) is grassroots organization of people dedicated to improving both formal and informal education at all levels in Oregon through the appropriate use of Information Technology (IT). It has a special focus on preservice teachers and inservice teachers.

  1. Go to the Oregon Technology in Education Council Website at http://otec.uoregon.edu/. On the homepage, read the paragraph that begins with "The Oregon Technology in Education Council (OTEC) is a grassroots organization …" Join both the general OTEC Email Distribution list and one of the discipline-specific lists.
  2. Develop (or, develop and implement) a lesson plan that effectively integrates higher-order use of IT into curriculum, instruction, and assessment. This should be in a specific discipline, and it should be discipline-specific. In your write-up of this lesson plan, provide solid evidence from researchers and practitioners to support the design and content of your lesson plan.
  3. Share your ongoing work (and, collaborate in a manner that seems appropriate to you) with people in the specific-purpose Email Distribution list mentioned in (1) above. Make your final product available to the people on this list.

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More Advanced IT Courses (Example from the University of Oregon)

Students in the Integrated Teaching (combined regular and special education) elementary school preservice education program at the University of Oregon complete a bachelor's degree during their first four years. The program of study includes core courses (such as the EDST 114 course Communication Using Computers), a number of Methods course, three field placement practicums, and a variety of other courses. During their fifth year, students do two field placement practicums, one term of student teaching, a Capstone Master's Project, and miscellaneous other coursework. They also do a Specialization in one of five possible areas. select one of five different areas for a Specialization. One of the options is a 16-credit Technology Specialization.

Here are brief summaries of two of the 2-credit courses required in the Technology Specialization .

Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age I [Online]. Accessed 12/5/00: http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~moursund/DigitalAge1/

This is the first term of a fall quarter and spring quarter (Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age II) 2-term sequence. In this 2-term sequence students will gain a broad understanding of information technology in instruction and how information technology is changing and will change the world's education systems. They will learn to plan for change and to be change agents. They will learn to be leaders in IT in education. The course is balanced between theory and practice. It is primarily intended for students in the Integrated Teaching teacher education program, although others can be admitted with the permission of the instructor.

Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age II [Online]. Accessed 12/5/00: http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~moursund/DigitalAge2/.

Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age (II) is the second term of a fall quarter (Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age I) and spring quarter 2-term sequence. In this 2-term sequence students will gain a broad understanding of information technology in instruction and how information technology is changing and will change the world's education systems. They will learn to plan for change and to be change agents. They will learn to be leaders in IT in education. The course is balanced between theory and practice. It is primarily intended for students in the elementary school Integrated Teaching teacher education program, although others can be admitted with the permission of the instructor.

Technology Products and Practices: ELTA 610 (4 credits Fall, 4 credits spring): [Online]. Accessed 12/9/00: http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~skyoder/ http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~skyoder/.

In the Fall term you will:

  • improve your overall personal productivity skills;
  • learn to program in Logo (MicroWorlds);
  • develop products that can be used in future lessons that may be used in your practicum or
  • elsewhere;
  • gain an understanding of a number of high end software products;
  • master one piece of sophisticated software;
  • In the Spring term you will:
  • Further develop your skills using the Web;
  • Learn to write Web-based instructional material;
  • Learn to use Adobe Go Live to author Web pages;
  • Learn the basics of networking;

Throughout both terms you will:

  • Gain an understanding of hypermedia development and instruction
  • Develop skills in technical writing;;
  • Understand choices in storage media;
  • Learn to use disk repair and machine diagnostic software;
  • Develop skills for keeping up to date with ever-changing technology;
  • Develop skills in troubleshooting hardware and software;
  • Gain a better understanding of computer architecture;
  • Gain an understanding of both the Macintosh and the Windows operating systems;

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